Last edited by Vudocage
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

5 edition of Letter on confederation to a friend in Newfoundland found in the catalog.

Letter on confederation to a friend in Newfoundland

by Matthew Ryan

  • 47 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [Montreal? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Canada -- Politics and government -- 1867-1873.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Matthew Ryan.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 microfiche
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20315042M
    ISBN 100665532806

    The island of Newfoundland has a language all its own. Born from the interaction of early English, Irish, and French settlers, and preserved by isolation, the uncommon speech of the province is a dialect of English that has been deemed one of the most distinct in the world, and it can vary from one community to the next, as well as from region to region. Year Diary: A Chronology of Newfoundland History from This unique item was created in when the St. John's daily newspaper, The Telegram, celebrated its th is a timeline of events covering years of Newfoundland history mixed with world events.

    Reconsidering Confederation. Reconsidering Confederation brings together Canada's leading historians to explore how the provinces, territories, and Treaty areas became the political frameworks we know today. In partnership with The Confederation Debates, this book traces the unique paths that each province and territory took on their journey to Confederation. Find out how to search in Aurora using AMICUS conversion guide. AMICUS numbers will continue to appear on some Library and Archives Canada webpages after the launch of our Aurora catalogue. Find out how to search in Aurora using AMICUS numbers: Search by AMICUS Numbers in thank you for your patience as we update our website.

    Newfoundland (/ ˈ nj uː f ən (d) l ə n d,-l æ n d, nj uː ˈ f aʊ n d-/, locally / ˌ nj uː f ən d ˈ l æ n d /; French: Terre-Neuve) is a large island off the east coast of the North American mainland, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and has 29 percent of the province's land area. The island is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by. Sir Robert Bond (–) was a Newfoundland nationalist who insisted upon the colony's equality of status with Canada, and opposed joining the confederation. Bond promoted the completion of a railway across the island (started in ) because it would open access to valuable minerals and timber and reduce the almost total dependence on.


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Letter on confederation to a friend in Newfoundland by Matthew Ryan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Letter on confederation to a friend in Newfoundland [microform] by Ryan, Matthew, d. ?Pages: Letter on confederation to a friend in Newfoundland. [Montreal?]: [publisher not identified], [?] (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Matthew Ryan.

The Newfoundland Confederate "big men," aiders and abettors, say in unctuous triumphant tones: "Now that we have beaten you let us work together for Newfoundland.

Of course we think more of ourselves than Newfoundland. We beat you by cheap propaganda, by cheap lies. We used sectarianism in our talks and in our letters. of 18G9, the voters of Newfoundland had rejected the idea of Confederation with Canada. The story of that rejection has not yet been adequately told.

The topic has been the subject of several articles, notably one by H.B. Mayo, "Newfoundland and Confederation in the Eighteen-Sixties" in the Canadian Historical Review forand another.

Newfoundland Images from the Centre for Newfoundland Studies Newfoundland Medical Association Publications, Newfoundland National Convention Many Confederate Newfoundlanders, including the author of the letter to the editor in The Evening Telegram, believed that “the family allowance plan [was] a marvelous one”(par.

4) and would bring Newfoundland an abundance of fortune along with other aspects of the Confederation. Family allowance gave families wishing to have more children the financial security of knowing that they would be able to support their offspring.

Like a detailed report, but in book form, of Newfoundland's advancements in most aspects of education, and some aspects of culture, since Confederation. The pre-Confederation days are described as being of unrelenting deprivation, assumedly.

John's, Newfoundland, Canada. The station's first broadcast occurred on Jwhen Newfoundland was a country onto itself and some 25 years before confederation with Canada when it became Canada's tenth Province.

The founder of VOWR was the Reverend Dr. J.G. Joyce, Minister at Wesley United Church (then Wesley Methodist. Joey Smallwood said it was the narrowest of escapes. Newfoundland joined Confederation in by a referendum result of 52 to 48 per cent. Smallwood, a small but tough man with horn-rimmed.

Confederation was presented as pro-British, and "British Union" became a new slogan. An anti-confederate response was to plaster St. John's with posters reading "Confederation Means British Union With French Canada." The vote which followed this unpleasant campaign resulted in a victory for confederation, which gai votes ( percent).

A view of Newfoundland shortly after Confederation, by a British civil servant who had been involved with Newfoundland for a year starting at the end of the war. addressed to a friend by a seaman aboard the HMS Boston.

Often interesting, at times not, sometimes silly, but overall a decent, if uneven, read. Subtitled "A book of. Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders tells the true story of how Newfoundland came to join Confederation. The true story, drawn from official documents and hours of personal interviews, of how Newfoundland and Labrador joined Confederation and became Canada''s tenth province in /5(33).

Stamp issued by Canada Post in on the occasion of Newfoundland’s Confederation with Canada. We can all lament that in the year the stamp was issued, it cost 4 cents to mail a letter. This is the story of Newfoundland’s Confederation with Canada as told by an old Newfoundlander: “Inwe Newfoundlanders officially.

Attempts to bring Newfoundland into Confederation in the s and s were met with lukewarm interest in the colony. InNewfoundland was in bankruptcy during the Great suspended responsible government and accepted an unelected Commission Government directed by Britain. In a referendum, Newfoundlanders were given the choice to either continue with the.

led to Newfoundland’s Confederation with Canada on Ma It is based on the current historical literature which owes a considerable debt to the recent excellent books on Newfoundland in this period by historians Peter Neary and David MacKenzie. Both historians. Four years later, Newfoundland author and entertainer Greg Malone argued in his book Don't Tell the Newfoundlanders: The true story of Newfoundland's Confederation with Canada, that the vote on joining Canada was illegally rigged in a conspiracy by Ottawa and Britain.

The book was a bestseller in Newfoundland. Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism P.O. Box St. John's, NL Canada A1B 4J6 Street Address. Confederation Building Prince Philip Drive St.

John's, NL Canada A1B 4J6 Visitor Information Centres. Find a Visitor Information Centre. The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is at its heart a book about Newfoundland. Johnston creates a fictionalized version of Joey Smallwood, a real Canadian labor organizer and politician, to tell this story of the province during the 20th century/5().

Books 12 great books from Newfoundland and Labrador In the wake of Newfoundland and Labrador's library cuts, we've curated a list of books from the province's finest writers. W hen a book’s title advertises that it is “the true story,” I immediately suspect that it is not. Greg Malone’s account is, for the most part, not untrue.

The government of the United Kingdom and the government of Canada decided that it would be best for all concerned if Newfoundland joined the Canadian confederation.

1 BOOKS Andrews, Ralph L. Post-Confederation Developments in Newfoundland Education, St. John’s Blake, Raymond B. Canadians at Last: Canada Integrates Newfoundland as a o Bridle, Paul (ed). Documents on Relations Between Canada and Newfoundland .The tenth province to join Confederation was Newfoundland in The first Premier of Newfoundland Joey Smallwood use to say that's when Canada joined Newfoundland.

Asked in History, Politics.Salt and pepper: comparing two paintings. If letters and reports can be duplicitous, what about paintings and maps? Take a look at Benjamin West’s famous work, The Death of General Wolfe (Figure ), which hangs in the National Gallery in y it is a very romantic interpretation of what actually took place inbut what truths does it reveal despite itself?